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Supplements

vitamin B complex
What Is It?
General Interaction
Cautions


What Is It?

A high-quality vitamin B complex supplement will provide, in one convenient pill, a full range of B vitamins, including biotin, choline, folic acid, inositol, PABA (para-aminobenzoic acid), and the six "numbered" B vitamins--vitamin B-1 (thiamin), B-2 (riboflavin), B-3 (niacin), B-5 (pantothenic acid), B-6 (pyridoxine), and B-12 (cobalamin). Combination products can simplify the process of taking individual B vitamins for a range of ailments including alcoholism, depression, diabetes, hair problems, lupus, multiple sclerosis, and stress.

Vitamin B complex products are generally available in two forms: B-50s and B-100s. In a B-50 complex, look for a minimum of the following: 400 mcg folic acid, 50 mcg B-12 and biotin, and at least 50 mg of all the other B vitamins. Generally twice this amount is found in B-100 complexes, except for the folic acid (400 mcg), which remains the same. A B-100 typically contains 100 mcg B-12 and biotin, and 100 mg of all the other B vitamins.

While convenient, combination B vitamin products can produce an unpleasantly strong vitaminlike odor and cause queasiness if taken on an empty stomach. To minimize these side effects and enhance absorption, take this vitamin pill with food. A bright yellow hue to the urine following a B-complex vitamin is a harmless side effect of the riboflavin (B-2).

General Interaction

The amount of each individual ingredient in a vitamin B complex is usually quite small. The best approach for anyone concerned about possible interactions with a drug or dietary supplement is to refer to the separate entries (riboflavin, folic acid, vitamin B-12 in our WholeHealthMD Reference Library.

Cautions

See individual entries in the WholeHealthMD Reference Library for cautions on specific ingredients contained in your vitamin B complex


Date Published: 04/19/2005
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