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Taro root

Why Eat It
Nutrition Chart


Why Eat It

The word taro (as well as dasheen, malanga, and other names) is applied to quite a number of starchy tropical tubers--all of them high-carbohydrate foods that are staples in the Pacific islands, Asia, the Caribbean, Africa, and parts of South America. Taro root's most familiar use is in poi, a sticky taro paste eaten in Hawaii. One of the more common forms of taro is a roughly cylindrical brown-skinned root with white or pale purple flesh.

You may find it in Spanish or Asian markets, and it may be cut open to display its quality. Choose a firm taro root with no shriveled or soft spots; store it in a cool, dry place or in the refrigerator crisper for no longer than one week.

Taro resembles potatoes in flavor and uses: Boil, bake, or steam it (peeling it before or after cooking) and serve it with flavorful sauce. Be sure to serve it hot, as it becomes very sticky as it cools.

Nutrition Chart

Taro Root/1 cup cooked

269
Total fat (g)
0.3
Saturated fat (g)
0.1
Monounsaturated fat (g)
0
Polyunsaturated fat (g)
0.1
Dietary fiber (g)
1
1
Carbohydrate (g)
65
Cholesterol (mg)
0
Sodium (mg)
29



Date Published: 04/21/2005
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