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Scallions

Why Eat It
Availability
Shopping
Storage
Preparation
Nutrition Chart


Why Eat It

Scallions are actually just very immature onions. Mature onions are allowed to grow a well-developed bulb, but scallions (sometimes called green onions) are pulled from the ground while their tops are still green and before a significant bulb has formed. Technically speaking, a scallion is even younger than a green onion (scallions are supposed to be bulbless, while green onions are harvested at the miniature bulb stage), from a consumer's viewpoint, the two types are nearly identical. Scallions can be eaten cooked or raw, and are valued for their savory flavor, which is characteristically milder than that of older onions. (In some countries, such as China, scallions are the most popular form of onion.) Nutritionally, they have a distinct advantage over older onions: The green tops of scallions, which can be enjoyed along with the white part, provide more vitamin C, folate, calcium, and beta-carotene, ounce for ounce, than full grown onions.

Availability

Scallions are readily available year-round, with quantities peaking somewhat in the early summer. The biggest suppliers are California, Arizona, New Jersey, and Texas, but scallions are grown in more than 30 states.

Shopping

Look for green, crisp tops and clean, white bottoms. As a rule, the more slender the bottoms are, the sweeter the scallions.

Storage

Compared to mature onions, scallions are quite perishable: Store them in the refrigerator in a tightly closed plastic bag and use them within three days; otherwise, the tops begin to wilt.

Preparation

First, cut away any wilted parts from the green ends and trim off the rootlets at the tip of the bulb. Both the white and green portions can be used as seasonings or salad ingredients, sliced or chopped, according to the size you need.

Nutrition Chart

Scallions/1/4 cup chopped

8
Total fat (g)
0.1
Saturated fat (g)
0
Monounsaturated fat (g)
0
Polyunsaturated fat (g)
0
Dietary fiber (g)
0.7
0
Carbohydrate (g)
2
Cholesterol (mg)
0
Sodium (mg)
4


Date Published: 04/21/2005
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