Phone

Drugs

Side Effects
Serious

Shallow or slow breathing, sinus congestion, changes in mental state, nosebleeds, fever, sneezing, runny nose, blurred or distorted vision, ear pain, bronchitis, itching, hallucinations, difficulty urinating, skin rash, fainting. Call your doctor immediately.
Common

Headache, sedation, dizziness, insomnia, nose irritation, confusion, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation, loss of appetite, clammy skin, unpleasant taste in mouth.
Less Common

Nervousness, unusual dreams, sluggishness, agitation, euphoria, floating sensation, trembling, stomach pain.
Butorphanol Tartrate


Drug Class:
Opioid (narcotic) analgesic

Available OTC?: No

Available Generic?: No

Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions


Available In
Nasal spray

Why Prescribed
To relieve headaches, postoperative pain, or other pain for which a narcotic analgesic is necessary.

How It Works
Butorphanol blocks pain impulses at specific sites in the brain and spinal cord.

Range and Frequency
Spray once into one nostril only. Do not spray into both nostrils unless directed by physician. Dose may be repeated in 60 to 90 minutes, and every 4 to 6 hours if needed.

Onset of Effect
Within 15 minutes.

Duration of Action
4 to 5 hours.

Dietary Advice
No special restrictions.

Storage
Store in a tightly sealed container away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Missed Dose
Not applicable; butorphanol should not be taken on a routine schedule.

Stopping the Drug
You may stop taking the drug if you are feeling better, but butorphanol should never be stopped abruptly after long-term regular use.

Prolonged Use
The effects of long-term use are unknown. This drug could be habit-forming. Consult your doctor regularly during prolonged use.

Over 60
Adverse reactions and side effects, particularly dizziness, may be more likely and more severe in older persons.

Driving and Hazardous Work
Do not drive or engage in hazardous work until you determine how the medicine affects you.

Alcohol
Avoid alcohol because it can further dull alertness and slow reflexes.

Pregnancy
Before taking butorphanol, discuss with your doctor the relative risks and benefits of using this drug while pregnant.

Breast Feeding
Butorphanol may pass into breast milk; caution is advised. Consult your doctor for advice.

Infants and Children
Butorphanol is not recommended for use by children under the age of 18.

Special Concerns
When you first use this medicine, get up slowly from a sitting or lying position to avoid dizziness. Tell any doctor or dentist whom you consult that you are using butorphanol. Do not increase or decrease the dosage without consulting your doctor. When using a new bottle of butorphanol, point the bottle away from you and pump about 3 times to start the pump. Each time you use the spray, wipe the tip with a clean tissue or cloth. Every 3 or 4 days, rinse the tip with warm water and wipe the tip for about 15 seconds, then dry. To administer a dose of butorphanol, first blow your nose gently. Hold your head forward a little, put the spray tip in the nostril, and aim for the back. Close the other nostril by pressing with one finger. After the spray, tilt your head back for a few seconds. Do not blow your nose.

Overdose Symptoms
Irregular heartbeat; difficulty breathing; seizures; cold, clammy skin; loss of consciousness; pinpoint pupils of eyes; severe drowsiness, restlessness, weakness, dizziness, or nervousness.

What to Do
Call your doctor, emergency medical services (EMS), or the nearest poison control center immediately.

Drug Interactions
The following drugs may interact with butorphanol: tranquilizers, sleeping pills, barbiturates, antihistamines, heart drugs, oral diabetes drugs, and antidepressants. Consult your doctor for specific advice about any drug you are taking.

Food Interactions
None expected.

Disease Interactions
Tell your doctor if you have had a heart attack or a head injury or if you have heart disease, a respiratory disease, a kidney problem, a liver problem, or a history of alcohol or drug abuse.

Date Published: 04/13/2005
Previous  |  Next
> Printer-friendly Version