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Side Effects
Serious

Joint pain, fever, unusual fatigue, skin rash or itching, lower back pain, yellow discoloration of the eyes or skin, severe abdominal pain, sore throat, pale skin, headache, pain or burning while urinating. Call your doctor immediately.
Common

Abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, loss of weight and appetite.
Less Common

Peptic ulcer disease, intestinal bleeding, lowered white and red blood cell counts.
Aminosalicylate Sodium


Drug Class:
Anti-infective/antitubercular agent

Available OTC?: No

Available Generic?: No

Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions


Available In
Tablets

Why Prescribed
To treat active tuberculosis; must be used in conjunction with other antitubercular agents, such as isoniazid, streptomycin, and rifampin.

How It Works
Aminosalicylate kills tuberculosis bacteria by preventing them from utilizing folic acid, a vitamin necessary for cell growth and reproduction.

Range and Frequency
Adults and teenagers: 4 to 6 grams every 12 hours; usually not more than 68 to 91 mg per lb of body weight a day. Children age 12 and under: 23 to 34 mg per lb of body weight every 12 hours. Aminosalicylate is taken in conjunction with other antitubercular agents.

Onset of Effect
Unknown.

Duration of Action
Unknown.

Dietary Advice
Take it with or after meals or with an antacid to minimize stomach irritation.

Storage
Store in a tightly sealed container away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Missed Dose
Take it as soon as you remember. This will help keep a constant level of medication in your system. If it is near the time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your regular dosage schedule. Do not double the next dose.

Stopping the Drug
Take it as prescribed for the full treatment period, even if you begin to feel better before the scheduled end of therapy. Treatment may continue for months or years. The decision to stop taking the drug should be made by your doctor.

Prolonged Use
Prolonged use with high doses may cause swelling in the front of the neck, menstrual changes in women, decreased sexual ability in men, unusual weight gain, and dry, puffy skin. Consult your doctor about the need for periodic medical examinations and laboratory tests if you take this medication for a prolonged period.

Over 60
Adverse reactions may be more likely and more severe in older patients.

Driving and Hazardous Work
Do not drive or engage in hazardous work until you determine how the medicine affects you.

Alcohol
No special precautions are necessary.

Pregnancy
Adequate studies of aminosalicylate use during pregnancy have not been done. Consult your doctor for specific advice if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Breast Feeding
Aminosalicylate passes into breast milk, but no problems have been documented.

Infants and Children
No special warnings; children may tolerate the drug better than adults.

Special Concerns
Do not take tablets that are brown or purple in color.

Overdose Symptoms
An overdose with aminosalicylate is unlikely.

What to Do
Emergency instructions not applicable.

Drug Interactions
Do not take rifampin within six hours of taking aminosalicylate. Other drugs may interact with aminosalicylate. Consult your doctor if you are taking aminobenzoates or other over-the-counter or prescription medications.

Food Interactions
None are anticipated, although aminosalicylate can interfere with the absorption of vitamin B12 and other nutrients; vitamin supplementation may be necessary.

Disease Interactions
Caution is advised when taking aminosalicylate. Consult your doctor if you have any of the following: gastric ulcers, epilepsy, heart disease, cancer, an overactive thyroid, or adrenal insufficiency. Use of aminosalicylate may cause complications in patients with liver or kidney disease, since these organs work together to remove the medication from the body.

Date Published: 04/13/2005
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