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Drugs

Side Effects
Serious

No serious side effects are associated with recommended doses of biotin. However, check with your doctor if you notice anything unusual while you are taking it.
Common

No common side effects are associated with recommended doses.
Less Common

No less-common side effects have been reported.
Biotin


Drug Class:
Vitamin

Available OTC?: Yes

Available Generic?: Yes

Generic 300 mcg
(Tishcon)
Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions


Available In
Capsules, tablets

Why Prescribed
Biotin is a vitamin found naturally in various foods (see Dietary Advice for more information). While most people get sufficient amounts of it in their diet, biotin may be prescribed as a dietary supplement for people on inadequate or unusual diets or with medical conditions that increase the need for it. Such conditions include a genetic deficiency of the enzyme (biotinidase) needed by the body to utilize biotin, intestinal malabsorption, seborrheic dermatitis in infancy and an inability to absorb biotin as a result of surgical removal of the stomach. Biotin deficiency may lead to dermatitis, hair loss, high blood cholesterol levels, and heart problems.

How It Works
Biotin is one of the B vitamins necessary for the formation of glucose and fatty acids, and for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates. B vitamins are particularly crucial to the proper functioning of the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

Range and Frequency
No recommended daily allowances (RDAs) have been established for biotin. The following daily intakes are advised. Adults and teenagers: 30 to 100 micrograms (mcg). Children ages 7 to 10 years: 30 mcg. Children ages 4 to 6 years: 25 mcg daily. Birth to 3 years: 10 to 20 mcg.

Onset of Effect
Unknown.

Duration of Action
Unknown.

Dietary Advice
Biotin can be taken with or between meals. Foods that contain biotin include cauliflower, liver, salmon, carrots, bananas, cereals, yeast, and soy flour. Biotin content is reduced when food is cooked or preserved.

Storage
Store in a tightly sealed container away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Missed Dose
Take it as soon as you remember.

Stopping the Drug
If you are taking biotin for a vitamin deficiency or medical problem, take it as prescribed for the full treatment period.

Prolonged Use
When biotin is prescribed to overcome a deficiency, periodic monitoring of biotin levels in the blood may be required.

Over 60
No problems are expected in older persons taking recommended doses of biotin.

Driving and Hazardous Work
The use of biotin should not impair your ability to perform such tasks safely.

Alcohol
No special precautions are necessary.

Pregnancy
No problems are expected with the intake of recommended doses of biotin during pregnancy.

Breast Feeding
No problems are expected with the intake of recommended doses of biotin during breast feeding.

Infants and Children
No problems are expected with recommended doses.

Special Concerns
Some drastic weight-reducing diets may not supply enough biotin. Consult your doctor for specific advice. Biotin is generally available as part of a multivitamin complex.

Overdose Symptoms
None. (No cases of biotin overdose have been documented.)

What to Do
Emergency instructions not applicable.

Drug Interactions
There are no known drug interactions associated with biotin.

Food Interactions
No known food interactions.

Disease Interactions
None reported.

Date Published: 04/13/2005
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