Phone

Drugs

Side Effects
Serious

Confusion; sexual dysfunction; heartbeat irregularities; hallucinations; seizures; extreme fatigue or drowsiness; blurred or altered vision; breathing difficulty; constipation; staring and absence of facial expression; impaired concentration; difficult urination; fever; extreme and persistent restlessness; loss of coordination and balance; difficulty swallowing or speaking; dilated pupils; eye pain; fainting; trembling, shaking, weakness, and stiffness in the extremities; shuffling gait; persistent, uncontrolled chewing, lip-smacking, or tongue movements; uncontrolled movements, including tics, twitching, twisting movements, and muscle spasms in the face, arms hands, and legs. Call your doctor immediately.
Common

Drowsiness or dizziness, headache, dry mouth or unpleasant taste, fatigue, heightened sensitivity to light, nausea, weight gain, increased appetite.
Less Common

Heartburn, insomnia, diarrhea, sweating, vomiting.
Amoxapine


Drug Class:
Tricyclic antidepressant

Available OTC?: No

Available Generic?: Yes

Asendin 50 mg
(Lederle)
Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions

 


 



Available In
Tablets

Why Prescribed
To relieve symptoms of major depression.

How It Works
Amoxapine affects levels of norepinephrine, a brain chemical that is thought to be linked to mood, emotions, and mental state.

Range and Frequency
Adults: To start, 50 mg, two to three times a day. Older adults: To start, 25 mg, two to three times a day. Dosages may be gradually increased, as determined by your doctor.

Onset of Effect
One to six weeks.

Duration of Action
Unknown.

Dietary Advice
To lessen stomach upset, take with food, unless your doctor instructs otherwise. Increase intake of fiber and fluids.

Storage
Store in a tightly sealed container away from heat, moisture, and direct light.

Missed Dose
If you take a one-time daily bedtime dose, do not take a missed dose in the morning because it may cause drowsiness. Call your doctor. If you take more than one dose a day, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your regular dosage schedule. Do not double the next dose.

Stopping the Drug
Take it as prescribed for the full treatment period, even if you feel better before the scheduled end of therapy. The decision to stop taking the drug should be made in consultation with your doctor. The dosage should be gradually tapered over several days when stopping.

Prolonged Use
The usual course of therapy lasts six months to one year; some patients may benefit from additional therapy. There is increased risk of movement disorders with prolonged use.

Over 60
Adverse reactions may be more likely and more severe in older patients. A lower dose may be warranted.

Driving and Hazardous Work
Use caution when driving or engaging in hazardous work until you determine how the medication affects you. Drowsiness and lightheadedness can occur.

Alcohol
Avoid alcohol.

Pregnancy
Adequate human studies have not been done. Consult your doctor.

Breast Feeding
Amoxapine passes into breast milk; do not use it while nursing.

Infants and Children
Not prescribed for children under the age of six.

Special Concerns
This is a potentially dangerous drug, especially if taken in excess. Tricyclic antidepressants should not be within easy reach of suicidal patients. If dry mouth occurs, use sugarless gum or candy for relief.

Overdose Symptoms
Difficulty breathing, severe fatigue, seizures, confusion, hallucinations, dilated pupils, irregular heartbeat, heart palpitations, fever, difficulty concentrating.

What to Do
Call your doctor, emergency medical services (EMS), or the nearest poison control center immediately.

Drug Interactions
Consult your doctor for specific advice if you are taking antithyroid agents, cimetidine, cisapride, clonidine, guanadrel, guanethidine, metrizamide, appetite suppressants, isoproterenol, ephedrine, epinephrine, amphetamines, phenylephrine, antipsychotic drugs, pimozide, methyldopa, metyrosine, metoclopramide, pemoline, promethazine, trimeprazine, rauwolfia alkaloids, MAO inhibitors, or central nervous system depressants.

Food Interactions
No known food interactions.

Disease Interactions
Consult your doctor if you have any of the following: a history of alcohol abuse, difficulty urinating, asthma, bipolar disorder, high blood pressure, stomach or intestinal problems, glaucoma, overactive thyroid, enlarged prostate, schizophrenia, seizures, a blood disorder, or kidney, heart, or liver disease.

Date Published: 04/13/2005
Previous  |  Next
> Printer-friendly Version