| Reference Library | WholeHealthMD


< Drugs Main | Previous Page
Interferon alfa-n3
Brand Name(s):
Alferon N
Drug Class:
Immunomodulator
Available OTC?: No
Available Generic?: No
Available In
Why Prescribed
How It Works
Range and Frequency
Onset of Effect
Duration of Action
Dietary Advice
Storage
Missed Dose
Stopping the Drug
Prolonged Use
Over 60
Driving and Hazardous Work
Alcohol
Pregnancy
Breast Feeding
Infants and Children
Special Concerns
Overdose Symptoms
What to Do
Drug Interactions
Food Interactions
Disease Interactions


Available In
Injection

Why Prescribed
To treat condylomata acuminata (genital or venereal warts) in patients 18 years of age or older.

How It Works
It acts in the same way as the body's natural interferons, which are proteins released by the immune system to fight viruses, cancer cells, and other types of disease. Interferon alfa-n3 is derived from human white blood cells and has an antiviral effect.

Range and Frequency
0.05 ml injected into each wart 2 times a week for up to 8 weeks. Total dose for each session should not exceed 0.5 ml (2.5 million units).

Onset of Effect
Unknown.

Duration of Action
Unknown; however, warts will continue to disappear after completion of 8 weeks of therapy and discontinuation of the drug.

Dietary Advice
Drink plenty of fluids to reduce risk of excessively low blood pressure.

Storage
Keep interferon alfa-n3 refrigerated but do not allow it to freeze.

Missed Dose
If you miss a dose, do not take the missed dose and do not double the next dose. Check with your doctor on what to do.

Stopping the Drug
The decision to stop taking the drug should be made by your doctor.

Prolonged Use
See your doctor regularly for tests and examinations if you must take this drug for a prolonged period.

Over 60
Adverse reactions may be more likely and more severe in older patients.

Driving and Hazardous Work
Do not drive or engage in hazardous work until you determine how the medicine affects you. Administering interferon at bedtime may help to minimize daytime sleepiness.

Alcohol
Avoid alcohol.

Pregnancy
Adequate studies have not been done. Consult your doctor for advice.

Breast Feeding
Interferon alfa-n3 may pass into breast milk; caution is advised. Consult your doctor for advice.

Infants and Children
No special studies have been done; consult your pediatrician.

Special Concerns
Do not change to another brand of alfa interferon without consulting your doctor. They have different dosage schedules. Try to avoid people with infections, because this drug can lower white blood cell levels temporarily and increase susceptibility to disease. Be careful when cleaning your teeth, and avoid cutting yourself when using sharp objects such as a razor. Avoid contact sports or other situations where bruising could occur.

Overdose Symptoms
No specific ones have been reported.

What to Do
Call your doctor or emergency medical services (EMS) immediately if you suspect an overdose.

Drug Interactions
Consult your doctor for specific advice if you are taking any prescription or over-the-counter medication, especially central nervous system depressants including antihistamines, alcohol, tranquilizers, or psychiatric medications.

Food Interactions
None are known.

Disease Interactions
Caution is advised when taking interferon alfa-n3. Consult your doctor if you have a history of bleeding or clotting disorders, chicken pox, shingles, psychological or neurological disorders, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, lung disease, or thyroid disease.


Date Published: 4/14/2005
Date Reviewed: 4/14/2005


Previous | Next



> Printer-friendly Version
Serious

Confusion, depression, nervousness, distractibility, impaired thinking, or thoughts of suicide; numbness or tingling of fingers, toes, and face; black, tarry, or bloody stools; blood in urine; chest pain; hoarseness; fever or chills after 3 weeks of treatment; irregular heartbeat; pain in lower back or side; difficult or painful urination; red spots on skin; unusual bleeding or bruising; increased incidence of infections. Call your doctor immediately.
Common

Flu-like symptoms, fatigue, muscle aches, fever, or chills in first weeks of treatment; general discomfort or ill feeling; headache; loss of appetite; nausea and vomiting; odd, metallic, or altered taste; skin rash; temporary hair loss. Side effects are more common with higher doses. Tolerance to high doses may be improved by gradually increasing the doses over the first weeks of treatment.
Less Common

Back pain, blurred vision, dizziness, dry mouth, dry or itching skin, profuse or unusual sweating, joint pain, leg cramps, lip or mouth sores, weight loss.
© 2000-2014. WholeHealthMD.com, LLC. 21251 Ridgetop Circle, Suite 150, Sterling, VA 20166. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Privacy Policy

Disclaimer: All material provided in the WholeHealthMD website is provided for educational purposes only. Consult your physician regarding the applicability of any information provided in the WholeHealthMD website to your symptoms or medical condition.